Month: August 2014

Hacking Traffic Light System is No Big Deal

Just imagine you are traveling to your office and on your way you didn’t get any traffic light. Well, this is absolutely possible if you know how to hack traffic lights. According to recent research by University of Michigan, it is extremely simple to hack wireless traffic light systems without any particular knowledge. All you need to have is a little bit of programming skills, interest in cybercrime and a laptop. In the study, the involved members at University of Michigan identified three prime weaknesses in the national traffic control systems that make the signal vulnerable. It is easy to hack traffic lights due to: Unencrypted wireless signals used to manage the lights The regular use of default password and username A vulnerable port The traffic light system is so vulnerable that the researchers at the University of Michigan were able to take the control of the lights without any complication. And the only thing the researchers used to hack the system is a laptop equipped with wireless card operating having same frequency as of the wirelessly connected lights. Once the researchers were able to get an entry in the system, they used some simple commands to change the time frequency of traffic lights. Also, they manipulated lights with the colors of the lights. They turned all the lights in a specific direction to green, which otherwise requires physical...

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Google tightens its Safe Browsing service

The search engine giant, Google lately announced to expand its Safe Browsing technology to notify users about deceptive software. This new addition to Google’s exclusive service, called as “deceptive software” will now warn users and website owners about all the websites that are known to distribute malware. It will block every kind of malware download and give instructions on how to detect and delete the harmful content. Primarily, the recent update in the Safe Browsing service will inform about the program that just claim to be genuine downloads but actually make unexpected tweaks in the homepage and browser settings. In an official post, Moheeb Abu Rajab, Google security engineer said that Chrome will show an instant warning if it found a download that may interrupt your browsing experience. The warning will read “filename.exe may harm your browsing experience, so Chrome has blocked it.” You can also ignore the warning and proceed to use the software from your list of Downloads. Starting next week, we’ll be expanding Safe Browsing protection against additional kinds of deceptive software: programs disguised as a helpful download that actually make unexpected changes to your computer—for instance, switching your homepage or other browser settings to ones you don’t want,” he further added. Today, there are as many as 1.1 billion people who are using Google’s Safe Browsing service in order to prevent going to remain safe...

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Point-of-sale systems compromised by Backoff malware

In a recent cyber security alert, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) revealed that more than 1,000 U.S. enterprise networks and different businesses have been attacked by a point-of-sale malware infection called “Backoff.” Typically this kind of malware infection captures all the information when a card is swiped for payment. Backoff, primarily is capable of scrapping memory for tracking data, commanding and controlling every type of communication, logging all inputs of your keyboard and inserting malicious stub into explorer.exe. In addition to this, the malware also injects malicious code in your PC’s Windows Explorer so that it can be re-launched if it crashes or forcibly stopped. In the alert, the DHS department added that Backoff  first appeared last year in October. And over the past year, measures have been taken for businesses that have had their point-of-sale systems compromised by Backoff. The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), a division of Homeland Security also said that cybercriminals have been trying “brute-force” techniques to put in the malware into Point-of-sales system equipped with remote desktop applications, such as Apple Remote Desktop, Chrome Remote Desktop, Microsoft Remote Desktop and LogMein. Also, US-CERT stated that “The impact of a compromised point-of-sale system can affect both the businesses and consumer by exposing customer data such as names, mailing addresses, credit/debit card numbers, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses to criminal elements. These breaches...

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Keep your Android phone secure with these security apps

Is your Android-based device really safe against emerging malicious threats? Unfortunately, it is not. And believe it or not, it is always vulnerable to all sorts of thefts, malware, mishaps and loss. In order to keep pace with known and unknown threats, it is highly suggested to install security apps. Below we have listed the best three security apps that you can consider installing on your Android-device. avast! Mobile Security This security app offers complete mobile protection from all the would-be thieves and emerging threats. It shields your smartphone from malware and malicious apps. The most amazing aspect about avast! Mobile Security app is that it filters all incoming calls and messages, enabling you to block specific numbers from calling or messaging you. With its Anti-Theft component you can easily track your lost or stolen device. In case your browser tries to open any infected URL, the Web Shield feature of the app, warns you much before. Not just this, this app adds a firewall to block potential threats. And to help keep your data usage in control, avast! Mobile Security if you exceed your monthly limits. Avira  Antivirus Security Amongst different types of security apps available, Avira Antivirus Security truly stands out. This app comes with state-of-the-art features to protect your digital data, photos, e-mails, contacts and even credit card details safe from every potential mobile threat. Also,...

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