In its latest bid to keep Google users safe, the search engine has taken a leaf from Mozilla’s book, the security book to be more precise and has blocked the launch of outdated plug – in its Google Chrome browser just like Mozilla’s Firefox security does. A trio of Google’s security engineers said in a post on the Chromium Blog that plug-ins that are out of date and hence prone to the exploitation of bugs would be refused a run in Chrome, hence making it more secure. Chromium is the name given to the open source development project that supports the Chrome Browser.

Users will be warned on initiation of infrequent plug-in

Though when exactly will this step be seen functional in Chrome. The only time span that has been indicated is that it will happen somewhere in the “medium term”. The plug-ins that would be blocked were not specified either. The engineers also informed that the users will receive assistance to update their old plug-ins. The engineers, Chris Evans, Juien Tinnes and Michael Zalewski also said that the users will receive a warning on the attempt of the initiation of an infrequently used plug in. as there are many plug ins that are installed but seldom required by internet users presently, so an attempt to initiate such a plug in can raise suspicion and hence Google Chrome will be warning the users on the event. However, the exact definition of these ‘infrequently utilised’ plug-ins was not touched upon by Evans, Tinnes or Zalewski.
There was no response from Google when quizzed about the changes in Chrome, any requests for details, information or clarification went unanswered.

What makes Chrome similar to Firefox now?

This move makes Google and Chrome a follower of Mozilla whose browser is already armed with the service of blocking out-dated plug-ins. The basic plug-in block was added to Firefox 3.5 by Mozilla in September last year, but the feature was fleshed out in Firefox 3.6 debuting in January. The latest Firefox has the ability to check browser plug-ins like Adobe’s Flash player or Quicktime (Apple) to ensure that they are up to date, further blocking out vulnerable ones from loading and then assisting users as to how to update the software. The engineers also informed that the users will receive assistance to update their old plug-ins. The engineers, Chris Evans, Juien Tinnes and Michael Zalewski also said that the users will receive a warning on the attempt of the initiation of an infrequently used plug in.

Both Mozilla and Google agree to the fact that the step has been taken in response to the increased attacks against such vulnerable plug-ins as Adobe’s Flash Player and Reader. However Google remains ahead of Mozilla in many other arenas.

For instance, chrome can update Adobe’s Flash Player automatically. It has even added an integrated PDF viewer to its “developer” built that is for Windows and Mac.