Adobe Flash Player 10.1 brings in support for a wide range of devices including smart phones running under Android 2.2—dubbed as Froyo. Also in the list of supported devices are netbooks and other Internet capable gadgets. Clearly, iPhone and iPad support in the future seems bleak as Steve Jobs has publicly refused to integrate Adobe player to its iOS for its known security holes.

After months of beta testing, Flash 10.1 final version was  released to the public.  Originally it was scheduled for release during the first half of the year; Adobe changed the release to the second half of the year.   Well, it seems Adobe is true to its words. Just a few weeks into the second half of the year, Android 2.2 users can now avail the product through the Android Marketplace.

The public release of Flash 10.1 beta version was deemed to be one of the topmost downloaded applications in the Android Marketplace.

Mobility Personified

Adobe’s new flash player is designed specifically to cater to the mobility needs of its users. Smartphones being limited to lower CPU computing powers, Adobe had to develop the player form the “ground up”.

Features

Users are treated to an application which fully optimizes the native capabilities of their devices. The key feature that seems to leap from the canvass is the player’s support for GPU acceleration. These make the Flash player experience completely compatible with mobile devices.

The GPU acceleration support redefines how the Flash player uses your resources especially those of your mobile devices. Streaming media using your mobile devices can gobble up most of your device’s limited resources. But with GPU support in the new Flash player 10.1, you can stream media while freeing up your CPU for a more enhanced multi-tasking experience. Battery life has also been a big issue when it comes to utilizing Flash player. The GPU acceleration support makes it possible to save on your precious battery stamina while on the go.

Video playback gets way better with the new release. Flash 10.1 gets support for peer-assisted video streaming or multicasting, HTTP support for live video streaming, and support for hardware-accelerated H.264 video playback. Another apparent improvement in video buffering has also been put in place allowing you to pause, rewind and fast-forward streaming video much like in any DVR player. That is, if your provider already supports this pretty neat feature.

Some Froyo users observed that Flash 10.1 does not let its player work with their sound profile settings. Although in silent mode, Flash player will still play sounds as is. Adobe Systems clears this up by saying that this is an Android problem and not the Flash Player’s fault.

Security-wise, the new version of Flash player now works with your browser settings. That is, to say, that your Flash player will not keep on caching when you enter in the private browsing mode.

Good news to multi-touch device users, Flash Player also comes with multi-touch support. The new accelerometer support also allows users to view their flash content in portrait and landscape mode. With the Smart Zooming feature users can scale their playback to full screen.

Flash Player 10.1 is available to those who will upgrade to Android 2.2, dubbed as Froyo. It also supports various platforms such as BlackBerry, Webs, future versions of Windows Phone, Limo, Me ego and Symbian OS. Alas, no support for Apple’s iOS; but not for the lack of trying, though. Steve Jobs is obstinate when it comes to Flash support in Apple products.

Devices that are supported include Dell Streak, Google Nexus One, HTC Evo, HTC Desire, HTC Incredible, DROID by Motorola, Motorola Milestone, Samsung Galaxy S and others.

For Adobe Sytems, this has been a major upgrade in terms of supporting multi platforms.

For those who can’t live without their flash content, this is definitely an enhancement to their mobile experience.